Vision & Mission

The women from the island of Socorro, Surigao Del Norte in the south of the Philippines have always used weaving in their day to day life for as long as they can remember. Weaving baskets and containers for everyday use out of Pandan used to be how everyone lived. Over the years Pandan and other natural handmade, sustainable products are being replaced with plastic and sythentic goods. This is very convenient for life on the island however this has seen a loss in the production of handmade products and the younger generations aren't learning the skills from the older generations. The children are more interested in the internet and movies than the 'slow' old way.

Many of the women on Socorro don’t have an opportunity to work or provide for their families. Weaving is a way for them to be able to care for their children, tend to the home and earn some money. When things happen to the men in the village the women can be left with the responsibility of earning for the family or even as widows with children and no way to provide for them. They rely very heavily on their religious group for support. Kabukasan works with the women in the community to provide empowerment, independence and a platform the women. We are helping to raise funds to assist in micro business loans, raising awareness of health and a sustainable practice and to restore the beautiful weaving techniques that have been lost to the modern world.

POST- Phillipines Textiles Research Institute training Socorro

The Women

I started weaving when I was 19 years old to help my family and buy things as a teenager. My family could not afford to buy small things like lotion or shampoo so I took up weaving. Since my husband left, weaving is the only source of income for our family have and it allows me to provide fo rmy children.

Dedita Dacera Juanite, 63 years old from Nueva Estrella

I learnt how to weave when I was 14 years old. I was in high school at the time, I remember weaving when I got home from school. It helped me pay for school and school supplies. Unfortunately I could not go to college because it was too expensive for me and weaving was not enough to support it. It is a such a blessing when this project came to our village as I still continue to weave now that I am married with 6 kids, it helps us a lot.

Shendy Longos Hingpit, 31 years old from Nueva Estrella

My first time weaving was when I was 14 years old, a second year high school student. Unfortunately I had to stop my school because my parents could not afford it and that’s when my mother taught me how to weave. Now I am very thankful for this opportunity. Thank you so much.

Lovelyrose Galo Cagatin (Lalay) 28 years old from Nueva Estrella

I know how to weave very well because I started it when I was just 12 years old. My mother is also a weaver and she taught me so could help support the family. I could not make it to the seminar (weaving natural dye class) but I am very thankful that I contributed to make mats with the other women. It helps my family so much. Thank you so much for this project.

Genaly Taripe (Kajet) 36 years old from Nueva Estrella

I learnt weaving from my mother when I was in grade 6 student. I weaved to help my mother because it’s our only source of income. Weaving provides money to buy rice, soap and other families daily needs. Until now that I am married with children I still continue to weave and have also taught my children. When I heard about the program to find women who know how to weave in our village I was not in doubt and interested to attend thinking there might be an opportunity to help my family. Thank god I did it and now I am very happy with the opportunity. A big thank you!

Esmeralda Sutana Galo (Esmie), 59 years old and live in Nueva Estrella

I started weaving when I was 16 years old because it was the only work my mother had. I could not continue to study because we didn’t have enough money so my mother taught me weaving instead to help the family. Now that I am married I still continue to weave to help my husband who is a fisherman in the village. Thank you so much for this program it helps our family so much. I am hoping that it will continue. Thank you.

Deliza Juanite Maturan, 31 years old

I started weaving when I was 12 years old. I always watched my mother when she weaved until I slowly picked it up. I continue weave and use mats to barter for rice to feed my family. When I heard about the seminar on how to naturally dye using trees I wanted to attend because I want to learn. I am very thankful to the people behind this opportunity to us less fortunate families. I am hoping that it will last. Thank you so much and God will always be with you.

Nelita Dacera (Lita), 59 years old from Nueva Estrella

I started weaving when I was 17 years old. My mother taught me how to weave for a living. Now that I am married with 7 children weaving is still my source of income to support the family. When I heard about the dye extraction and application training I was willing to attend and I am very happy and thankful because it makes a big difference to our lives. Thank you very much for the help.

 

Chona Bato, 48 years old from Nueva Estrella

I was just 10 years old when I learnt how to weave. I sold a mat for 50 pesos at the time and when I got married the price went up to 150 pesos.  I use the money to buy rice and fish for my family. I am very thankful that I joined the training when I heard about it. I am still weaving to make money to support my family.

Lorna Hingpit, 64 years old from Nueva Estrella